How to make a Batman costume for cosplay

How to make the Batman costume for cosplay

This is a step-by-step guide on how to make a Batman costume. The preparation of this costume can take some time, but the actual sewing takes only about two weeks, depending on your sewing speed and abilities.

Preparation

Just like with the Iron Man costume [link], you need to make a plan. Determine which materials you have at home and what you are going to get from your local store(s). Check if you have enough time to do this project in between your other commitments, e.g., do not start this project during the exam period. Do also check if someone is willing to paint all the pieces for you at the same time as you sew them, or if you must fit everything in your schedule by yourself.

Using Photoshop

Using Photoshop, I designed two things: (1) my pattern; (2) a template of where I would place each piece on the fabric after cutting it out using said pattern. You can use these images as templates for your project, too. This makes everything much easier to understand.

Materials

For this Batman costume I used the following materials:

·         A sewing machine (with a quilting attachment) and tools;

·         white cotton fabric with some stretch for the bodysuit;

Fabric weight

Note: The total weight of all fabrics was about 2 kg/4 lbs. If you manage to get 100% pure cotton material instead of blended ones, then it weighs less. But remember that full-stretch material is often thinner than regular, not so stretchy fabric! 

This will have an impact on how many layers you need to sew. Also, in order to be able to “support” the structure of the costume, it is important to get the proper weight of the fabric.

I got all my materials at a local store, next to where I live.

Practice first 

If you’ve never made anything before or are just starting out with sewing costumes, then I recommend that you practice as much as possible before beginning any project. 

Making the costume

Making the costume involves many detailed steps, so it would be helpful if you have previous experience in drawing patterns and following directions when using them. 

Tools

You will also need an inexpensive sewing machine (with basic functions), thread to match the fabric colors, thin cardboard for patterns, scissors for cutting pattern pieces, tailor’s chalk, an iron, and sewing pins. You will also need to use a hot glue gun for the base of Batman’s cape. 

Layers

As you will be wearing this costume at a convention or performance event, it is best if you wear layers under it to make it more comfortable. I recommend wearing black fabric pants and a t-shirt since they are the same color as the actual costume underneath. They are also warmer than going completely shirtless as it can get cold when cosplaying in some conventions. 

Batmans belt buckle

If you want your own Batman belt buckle, then go out and buy one that has the right dimensions (2 inches wide x 2 inches high). If you don’t have time to do so before your event happens, then just follow the instructions below to make a buckle out of cardboard that looks good enough for your costume. 

You can then paint it and draw on it with a silver marker to get it closer to the real thing. 

Easy to make

This costume is relatively easy to make compared to other costumes such as Edward Elric from Fullmetal Alchemist or Naruto (Shippuuden). 

It might seem difficult at first, but since this is only step-by-step, you should be able to complete it easily! 

Measurements

All measurements are given in inches; however, all measurements must be doubled if you use centimeters. 

This will enable you to have more accuracy when drawing your patterns. All seams are 1/2 inches unless otherwise noted. 

How the costume goes together

PART 1: THE CAPE (steps 1 – 4)

1) Cut two pieces of fabric for the cape out of dark blue thin velour fabric with scissors. The pattern is traced from a piece of cardboard that has been cut into a rectangle that measures 48 inches long x 24 inches wide. 

Make sure the sides are straight and even at this point before going on to step 2. 

2) Fold each side in, towards the center, again making sure both sides are equal length so there is no difference between them. 

Make sure to fold exactly in half so it will be easy when sewing later on! The side seam should be 12 inches long at this point as you just folded it in half.

3) Sew along each side seam to create the hem of the cape, making sure to backstitch (meaning you will sew over the seam twice and then repeat on the other side), shown below. 

The thread color must be dark blue or black! 

4) Turn right-side out so that the fabric is on the inside, and iron down any creases you see from folding it up. 

Also, add extra folds at the end of each strip to make it easier when putting on later! Your cape should now look like this:

PART 2: THE COLLAR (step 5 – 7)

5) Take one piece of light blue felt for Batman’s collar and fold it in half with the wrong sides facing each other. Make sure you have the same amount on both sides. 

Fold it into a diamond shape (if using metric, make sure to double the original size on each side) and mark on top of one point with tailor’s chalk, as shown below. This will be where it is pinned later on!  

This is an important step for making Batman’s collar look like his real costume.

6) Sew along three edges of the triangle part of the collar (the white dotted line), backstitching at each end as shown below. 

Leave a small hole open at the bottom edge so that you can turn it right-side-out later! Also cut two slits in the wide tip at this time, leaving about 1/2 inch between them.  This will help with folding the collar into a point later on.

7) Turn right-side out and iron down any creases you see from folding it up. It should now look like this:

PART 3: THE PARTS OF THE BODY (steps 8 – 23)

8) Take a long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric for Batman’s cape, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, and sew both short ends together to create a tube that is 48 inches long x 2 inches wide. 

Make sure both edges are straight and even in width at this point! If you do not have time to buy a bolt of cloth, then just go ahead and make one yourself using a rectangular piece of fabric and sewing it together. However, make sure the two sides are straight and even in width.

10) Once you have created the tube, draw a circle around a glass that is 8 inches wide to cut out for putting Batman’s head through. 

If you do not already have one at home, you can make your own by taking a circular piece of cardboard that is 8 inches wide and then making small cuts around the edge with scissors (you will need to do this several times if there are any curves). 

Then just put it into whatever kind your head fits best! Make sure your circle is exactly 8 inches when done before moving on!

11) Take two pieces of dark blue thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle but 2 inches wide) and sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance.  

Make sure they are straight! Also, add a piece of velcro to both pieces so that it is easy for headgear attachment later on (add the piece of fabric with the rough side facing out).

12) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s belt. 

13) Take a long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s belt loops on the pants and utility belt. 

14) Take two pieces of light blue felt (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. 

Make sure they are straight! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s front side release belt panel on the pants and utility belt. 

15) Take a long, rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric (for the backside of Batman’s pants), fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s rear side release belt panel on the pants and utility belt. 

16) Take 2 long pieces of black thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. 

Make sure they are straight! Also, add 4 strips of light blue felt that are release belt panel), fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s back belt loop on the pants and utility belt. 

17) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt buckle (with two release belt panels). 

18) Take 2 strips of light blue felt that are 8 inches in width by 14 inches in height and sew them together on 2 short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Sew in place (with the fuzzy side facing out) on the backside of both release belt panels. 

19) Take 2 strips of black thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle in the photo but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. 

Make sure they are straight! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt pouch (with 4 pieces of light blue felt sewn into it). 

20) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt pouch flap (with 3 dark blue pieces sewn into it). 

21) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt buckle tongue. 

22) Take 1 long rectangular piece of dark brown thin velour fabric (for the inside of Batman’s pants), fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s rear side release belt panel on the pants and utility belt (with 4 pieces of light blue felt sewn into it). 

23) Take 1 strip of black thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle in the photo but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Make sure they are straight! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s belt buckle loop (with 3 dark blue pieces sewn into it). 

This is a step-by-step guide on how to make the Batman costume. The preparation of this costume can take some time, but the actual sewing takes only about two weeks, depending on your sewing speed and abilities.

Preparation

Just like with the Iron Man costume [link], you need to make a plan. Determine which materials you have at home and what you are going to get from your local store(s). Check if you have enough time to do this project in between your other commitments, e.g., do not start this project during the exam period. Do also check if someone is willing to paint all the pieces for you at the same time as you sew them, or if you must fit everything in your schedule by yourself.

Using Photoshop

Using Photoshop, I designed two things: (1) my pattern; (2) a template of where I would place each piece on the fabric after cutting it out using said pattern. You can use these images as templates for your project, too. This makes everything much easier to understand.

Materials

For this Batman costume I used the following materials:

·         A sewing machine (with a quilting attachment) and tools;

·         white cotton fabric with some stretch for the bodysuit;

Fabric weight

Note: The total weight of all fabrics was about 2 kg/4 lbs. If you manage to get 100% pure cotton material instead of blended ones, then it weighs less. But remember that full-stretch material is often thinner than regular, not so stretchy fabric! 

This will have an impact on how many layers you need to sew. Also, in order to be able to “support” the structure of the costume, it is important to get the proper weight of the fabric.

I got all my materials at a local store, next to where I live.

Practice first 

If you’ve never made anything before or are just starting out with sewing costumes, then I recommend that you practice as much as possible before beginning any project. 

Making the costume

Making the costume involves many detailed steps, so it would be helpful if you have previous experience in drawing patterns and following directions when using them. 

Tools

You will also need an inexpensive sewing machine (with basic functions), thread to match the fabric colors, thin cardboard for patterns, scissors for cutting pattern pieces, tailor’s chalk, an iron, and sewing pins. You will also need to use a hot glue gun for the base of Batman’s cape. 

Layers

As you will be wearing this costume at a convention or performance event, it is best if you wear layers under it to make it more comfortable. I recommend wearing black fabric pants and a t-shirt since they are the same color as the actual costume underneath. They are also warmer than going completely shirtless as it can get cold when cosplaying in some conventions. 

Batmans belt buckle

If you want your own Batman belt buckle, then go out and buy one that has the right dimensions (2 inches wide x 2 inches high). If you don’t have time to do so before your event happens, then just follow the instructions below to make a buckle out of cardboard that looks good enough for your costume. 

You can then paint it and draw on it with a silver marker to get it closer to the real thing. 

Easy to make

This costume is relatively easy to make compared to other costumes such as Edward Elric from Fullmetal Alchemist or Naruto (Shippuuden). 

It might seem difficult at first, but since this is only step-by-step, you should be able to complete it easily! 

Measurements

All measurements are given in inches; however, all measurements must be doubled if you use centimeters. 

This will enable you to have more accuracy when drawing your patterns. All seams are 1/2 inches unless otherwise noted. 

How the costume goes together

PART 1: THE CAPE (steps 1 – 4)

1) Cut two pieces of fabric for the cape out of dark blue thin velour fabric with scissors. The pattern is traced from a piece of cardboard that has been cut into a rectangle that measures 48 inches long x 24 inches wide. 

Make sure the sides are straight and even at this point before going on to step 2. 

2) Fold each side in, towards the center, again making sure both sides are equal length so there is no difference between them. 

Make sure to fold exactly in half so it will be easy when sewing later on! The side seam should be 12 inches long at this point as you just folded it in half.

3) Sew along each side seam to create the hem of the cape, making sure to backstitch (meaning you will sew over the seam twice and then repeat on the other side), shown below. 

The thread color must be dark blue or black! 

4) Turn right-side out so that the fabric is on the inside, and iron down any creases you see from folding it up. 

Also, add extra folds at the end of each strip to make it easier when putting on later! Your cape should now look like this:

PART 2: THE COLLAR (step 5 – 7)

5) Take one piece of light blue felt for Batman’s collar and fold it in half with the wrong sides facing each other. Make sure you have the same amount on both sides. 

Fold it into a diamond shape (if using metric, make sure to double the original size on each side) and mark on top of one point with tailor’s chalk, as shown below. This will be where it is pinned later on!  

This is an important step for making Batman’s collar look like his real costume.

6) Sew along three edges of the triangle part of the collar (the white dotted line), backstitching at each end as shown below. 

Leave a small hole open at the bottom edge so that you can turn it right-side-out later! Also cut two slits in the wide tip at this time, leaving about 1/2 inch between them.  This will help with folding the collar into a point later on.

7) Turn right-side out and iron down any creases you see from folding it up. It should now look like this:

PART 3: THE PARTS OF THE BODY (steps 8 – 23)

8) Take a long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric for Batman’s cape, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, and sew both short ends together to create a tube that is 48 inches long x 2 inches wide. 

Make sure both edges are straight and even in width at this point! If you do not have time to buy a bolt of cloth, then just go ahead and make one yourself using a rectangular piece of fabric and sewing it together. However, make sure the two sides are straight and even in width.

10) Once you have created the tube, draw a circle around a glass that is 8 inches wide to cut out for putting Batman’s head through. 

If you do not already have one at home, you can make your own by taking a circular piece of cardboard that is 8 inches wide and then making small cuts around the edge with scissors (you will need to do this several times if there are any curves). 

Then just put it into whatever kind your head fits best! Make sure your circle is exactly 8 inches when done before moving on!

11) Take two pieces of dark blue thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle but 2 inches wide) and sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance.  

Make sure they are straight! Also, add a piece of velcro to both pieces so that it is easy for headgear attachment later on (add the piece of fabric with the rough side facing out).

12) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s belt. 

13) Take a long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s belt loops on the pants and utility belt. 

14) Take two pieces of light blue felt (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. 

Make sure they are straight! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s front side release belt panel on the pants and utility belt. 

15) Take a long, rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric (for the backside of Batman’s pants), fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s rear side release belt panel on the pants and utility belt. 

16) Take 2 long pieces of black thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. 

Make sure they are straight! Also, add 4 strips of light blue felt that are release belt panel), fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s back belt loop on the pants and utility belt. 

17) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt buckle (with two release belt panels). 

18) Take 2 strips of light blue felt that are 8 inches in width by 14 inches in height and sew them together on 2 short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Sew in place (with the fuzzy side facing out) on the backside of both release belt panels. 

19) Take 2 strips of black thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle in the photo but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. 

Make sure they are straight! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt pouch (with 4 pieces of light blue felt sewn into it). 

20) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt pouch flap (with 3 dark blue pieces sewn into it). 

21) Take one long rectangular piece of dark blue thin velour fabric, fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s utility belt buckle tongue. 

22) Take 1 long rectangular piece of dark brown thin velour fabric (for the inside of Batman’s pants), fold it with the wrong sides facing each other, sew along both short ends only, leaving a hole big enough so you can turn it right-side out. 

Make sure they are straight at this point! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s rear side release belt panel on the pants and utility belt (with 4 pieces of light blue felt sewn into it). 

23) Take 1 strip of black thin velour fabric (cut to be the same shape and length as the circle in the photo but 2 inches wide), sew them together on two short ends with a 1/2 inch seam allowance. Make sure they are straight! Then iron down any creases seen from folding up. This will be used for Batman’s belt buckle loop (with 3 dark blue pieces sewn into it). 

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